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Lane Family Tree

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Lane Family History Page 1

Following I have included what information that I have to this point about some of the people in our trees. I'll include sources for the information wherever possible.

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Adam De La Lone Born about 1046
SOURCE:...THE LANE FAMILY THE DESCENDANTS OF MAJOR SAMUEL LANE PART 1 COMPILED BY LARRY A. JAMES, 19 86. LISA WILSON-PENNINGTON FAMILY TREE. IN IN 1086-TWO DECADES AFTER MASTERMINDING A CROSS-CHANNEL INVASION AND INSTALLING HIMSELF AS KING OF ENGLAND--WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR ORDERED A CENSUS OF ALL LAND, LIVESTOCK, POPULATION, AND OTHER RESOURCES OF THE REALM, T HE BETTER TO ASSESS TAXES. THE RESULTING TAX ROLL CAME TO BE KNOWN AS THE "DOO MSDAY BOOK," AND IT IS STILL A VALUABLE SOURCE OF INFORMATION ABOUT EVERYDAY LI FE IN THE 11TH CENTURY..SCHOLARS CLAIM THAT THE WORD DOOMSDAY SIMPLY REFLECTED THE IDEA OF AN ECONOMIC "DAY OF JUDGMENT," BUT THEY MAY BE MISSING THE POINT. CAN IT BE COINCIDENCE THAT WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR WAS ALSO KNOWN AS WILLIAM THE BASTARD????

Born around 1400. A resident of County Northampton, England. Married to Anne Sutton. Parents of Sir William(1) Lane of Northampton. He probably died by 1465.

William Lane Born abt 1469
SOURCE:..(LISABACKUP3C.FTW)...(BRODERBUND WFT VOL. 11 ED. 1 TREE #2730, DATE OF IMPORT: MAR. 7, 1999) THE LANE FAMILY TRACES ITS ROOTS BACK TO ADAM de la LONE OF FRANCE WHO CAME OVER TO ENGLAND WITH WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR (1027-1087.) THE NAME WAS LATER CHANGED TO LANE. RUSSELL SLAGLE, A NOTED LANE RESEARCHER. FROM HIS RESEARCH, IT WAS NOTED THAT THE ARMS WERE FIRST MENTIONED IN THE 1564 VISITATION OF NORTHAMPTON. THE PEDIGREE BEGINS WITH WILLIAM OF ORLYBERE, COUNTY NORTHAMPTON..IT IS THROUGH THE EFFORTS OF MR. SLAGLE THAT THE FOLLOWING ANCESTRY O F MAJOR SAMUEL LANE CAN BE RECORDED.....FROM BURKE'S LANDED GENTRY THE FOLLOWING G IS FOUND..."THIS BRANCH OF THE LANE FAMILY IS OF SOME ANTIQUITY IN CO. NORTHAMPTON. IN 1469 (9 EDWARD IV) WILLIAM LANE WAS POSSESSED OF ORLINGBURY MANOR OF LORDSHIP, AND DIED 1546, LEAVING IT TO HIS ELDEST SON SIR RALPH LANE." THIS RALP H LANE MARRIED MAUD PARR, WHO WAS A FIRST COUSIN OF KATHERINE PARR, SIXTH WIFE OF HENRY VIII. SOURCE;...THE LANE FAMILY...THE DESCENDANTS OF MAJOR SAMUEL LANE ...PART 1 COMPILED BY LARRY A JAMES, 1986
Source:: Ancestors of Lesa Gibson ID:10519 (lesapformmer@yahoo.com)

Ralph Lane Born 1526
SOURCE; WILSON AND PENNINGTON FAMILY TREE... (BRODERBUND ND WFT VOL. 11, ED. 1 TREE #2730, DATE OF IMPORT MAR. 7, 1999 AN UNDATED NEWSPAPER CLIPPING IN THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY STATES THAT "SIR RALPH LANE OF ORLINGBURG, ENGLAND, WHOSE WIFE, NEE PARR, WAS A FIRST COUSIN OF KATHERINE PARR, SIXTH QUEEN OF KING HENRY VIII, WAS PROGENITOR OF THE LANES OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA; HR WAS ALSO THE FATHER OF SIR RALPH LANE, WHO FOUNDED THE COLONY OF ROANOKE AND WAS THE FIRST ENGLISH GOVERNOR IN AMERICA." THE NEWSPAPER ARTICLE CONCERNED COL. JOEL LANE OF BLOOMSBURY, NORTH CAROLINA, A REVOLUTIONARY WAR OFFICER AND COLLATERAL COUSIN OF ISAAC LANE, WHOSE DESCENDANTS SETTLED IN POLK COUNTY, ARKANSAS.....SOURCE: JOY RUSSELL
ID: 10511 Source Lisa Gibson

One Source of information for Roger Lane as follows:

Roger Lane - Before 1560 to 1603

The little we know of this person comes from the Church records. We
know he was an Apothecary (chemist) by profession. He lived all his life
in Hereford, England. He and his wife, Beatrix, baptized their ten
children between January 1590 and January 1602. The father died and was
buried April 30, 1603, leaving his young wife and eight living children.
An untold story without doubt. Their son, Richard Lane, was six years old
at the time of this father's death and is of particular interest to us.


Another source of information for Roger Lane written as follows:

Roger Lane Born 1569
SOURCE; WILSON AND PENNINGTON FAMILY TREE. ROGER LANE OF HEREFORD WAS MARRIED AROUND 1589.. ST. PETERS CHURCH IN HERFORD LISTS THE BAPTISM OF THEIR TEN (10) CHILDREN BETWEEN JANUARY 29, 1590 AND JANUARY 10, 160 2..BY PROFESSION, ROGER LANE WAS AN APOTHECARY..RECORDS FURTHER SHOW THAT ROGER LANE WAS BURIED ON APRIL 30, 1603 LEAVING HIS WIDOW BEATRIX AND EIGHT LIVING CHILDREN. SOURCE: THE LANE FAMILY THE DESCENDANTS OF MAJOR SAMUEL LANE. PART 1 COMPILED BY LARRY A. JAMES 19 86

Richard Lane - 1596-1657

Richard was the son of Roger Lane. We can assume Richard grew up in
the City of Hereford. There is no record that his young widowed mother
remarried. Richard must have left Hereford and come to London as a very
young man. On December 14, 1613, he apprenticed to Nathaniel Thornhill for
seven years. Thornhill was a merchant tailor by trade. On February 26,
1620, at 24 years old, Richard was admitted a freeman to the Merchant
Tailor Co. He apparently prospered in his trade.
On October 7, 1623, Richard married Alice Carter at London. Richard's
religious beliefs appear to have been unorthodox and with a Puritan
leaning. He was not secretive about his opinions. This was during a
period when the Church of England and Authorities of the Crown were
persecuting the Puritans. In October 1631, there was an "Examination of
Richard Lane" by authorities. This examination worried Richard. He was
fearful of what the future might bring to he and his family. His children
were coming along, Samuel in 1628, John in 1631 and Oziell in 1632. As a
result, he arranged for a trip to the West Indies as a representative of
the Company of Providence Island, a quasi-governmental oganization formed
to exploit the Colony.
Richard reached Providence Island in 1635. He was assigned to introduce
and supervise growing madder (a small plant, the root of which was to make
a red dye). During his stay on the Island, 1635-1657, he had his ups and
downs. For most of the period, he appears to have been in the good graces
of the Company. In 1641, he came under criticism for his Puritanical
religious views. He, along with two clergymen, were ordered arrested and
brought to trial in London. At the hearing, the charges were found
unmerited and Lane was returned to his duties. Later in 1641, he was
unsuccessfully nominated Governor of Providence Island. Sometime before
August 1657, Richard and his son, Oziell, were drowned at Providence
Island. His widow, Alice, petitioned the Company for payments in arrears
and a pension. The petition was approved and the widow and children
returned to London. One of their sons, Samuel (1), a direct ancestor,
probably had returned earlier for his education.

Another Resource on Richard Lane reports as follows:

Richard Lane Born abt. August 27, 1596
RICHARD LANE, SON OF ROGER AND BEATRIX LANE, WAS BAPTIZED AT ST. PETERS CHURCH ON AUGUST 27 1596 AT HERFORD, ENGLAND. HE LEFT HERFORD AN AN EARLY AGE AND WAS APPRENTICED TO NATHANIEL THORNHULL OF BIRCHIN LANE FOR SEVEN (7) YEARS FROM TH E 14TH OF DECEMBER 1613 AND WAS ADMITTED TO THE FREEDOM OF THE COMPANY ON THE 2 6TH OF FEBRUARY 1620. MAG. WINTER 1976 PG. 549-550...THE LANE FAMILY PART 1 BY LARRY A JAMES 1986, MERCHANT, TAILOR, PURITAN EMBARKED FOR WEST INDIES IN 1632 (CALENDAR OF STATE PAPERS, COLONIAL SERIES 1574 TO 1660) DROWNED AT ELEUTHERA ISLAND.
THE FINAL RECORD CONCERNING RICHARD LANE WAS FOUND IN THE FOLLOWING. AUGUST 7, 1657, PETITION OF ALLICE LANE, SETS FORTH HER GREAT SUFFERINGS IN THE WEST INDIES, HER HUSBAND AND SON HAVING BEEN DROWNED IN ELEUTHERA, AND THAT ARREARS FOR SERVICE IN ENGLAND OF 702 POUNDS, 13 SHILLINGS, AND 6 PENCE ARE CERTIFIED

Alice Carter
THE FINAL RECORD CONCERNING RICHARD LANE WAS FOUND IN THE FOLLOWING. AUGUST 7, 1657, PETITION OF ALLICE LANE, SETS FORTH HER GREAT SUFFERINGS IN THE WEST INDIES, HER HUSBAND AND SON HAVING BEEN DROWNED IN ELEUTHERA, AND THAT ARREARS FOR SERVICE IN ENGLAND OF 702 POUNDS, 13 SHILLINGS, AND 6 PENCE ARE CERTIFIED

Richard Lane - Tidbits

On 5 April 1671, a marriage license was issued to Captain John Lane
(an Uncle of Richard Lane) age about 41, to Elizabeth Saltonstall, a widow,
age about 34. She was the widow of Charles Saltonstall. Both husbands
were considerably older than she. Both men were wealthy and adventurous
mariners. She appears to have prospered through her marriages.

The connection between the prominent Saltonstall family of London,
England and Boston, Massachusetts, USA and the early Lane ancestors existed
in these early times.

Of interest is that some 300 years later, another association between
the Leverett Saltonstall and the Russell Lane family of Ithaca, New York
developed. (See R.R.Lane reflections on the Saltonstalls.)

Samuel (1) Lane-1628 to 1682

Samuel (1) was born in 1628 in London, England. He was the son of
Richard and Alice Lane. Samuel spent his early years on Providence Island,
West Indies. Sometime before or by 1657, he returned to London. He
appears to have been educated and trained as a clergyman. In 1662, he was
"ejected" from his church in Northumberland over differences of opinion.
His clergy career appears to have been abandoned. He married Barbara
Roddam but she died before 1664. No record of children by this marriage.
Samuel (1) emigrated to Maryland in 1664. Between his arrival and
1682, he is variously referred to as gentleman: doctor: Commissioner of
Anne Arundel County, Maryland: gentleman of the quorum and Major in the
Army. He seems to have acquired his medical training from local doctors.
He married Margaret Maulden Burrage, the wealthy widow of John Burrage.
Through his wife's inheritance, he benefitted by 4 or 5 Estate type country
homes/plantations in Maryland. He administered and managed these
properties well. The family was considered wealthy and of high class.
Samuel (1) and Margaret had issue of Samuel (Jr.); Dutton and Sarah.
Samuel (1) died around 1682 in Maryland. His widow remarried Job Evans.
The widow left but her former properties stayed with the Lane family.

Samuel(1) Tidbits

From April 1638 Captain Nathaniel Butler was Governor of Providence
Island, West Indes. The Governor and Richard Lane were close friends.
Governor Butler had previously visited the Maryland area of America and was
fascinated by it. The two men frequently discussed settling there sometime
in the future. Richard's son Samuel(1) was often present for the
discussions and seems to have been greatly impressed by the discriptions of
the area. Richard drowned at Providence Island in 1657. His son Samuel(1)
emigrated to Maryland in 1664.
In 1632 King Charles I gave the Earl of Baltimore a large grant of
American lands, including Maryland. Settlements of the area began shortly
afterward. Cromwell's victory over Charles I prompted a sizeable migration
of Cavaliers to America. The English legal doctrine of 'Primogeniture',
which gave inheritance of a father's estate (including titles) to the
eldest son, was also responsible for further American settlement. The
doctrine was responsible for leaving many younger sons without family
financial support. Many sought new opportunities in America. The social
and economic system being developed in Maryland was similar to that of the
Gentry Class of England.
The large estates/plantations emerging in Maryland were mainly devoted
to production of tobacco, for export to England. Land was plentiful and
productive. Labor was cheap through the system of indentured persons,
abolished convicts and the intoduction of slaves. The profits were great.
The resulting wealth went into grand estate homes and an extension of the
English gentry system in America.
Samuel(1) appears to have been accepted as an upper class person, upon
his arrival in Maryland. He also seems to have made good use of the
opportunities offered in the New World. He emerged a wealthy, respected and
esteemed person by the time of his death.
**********************
During the first 50 or so years of settlement of Maryland,
the area was sparsely occupied and much of the it was under the control of
Indians. Sometime before 1675, Samuel(1) came into the army service of
the King of England as a Major. The local army was made up of local
residents who were on call, in time of crisis. The officers were appointed
by the Crown and were responsible for recruiting and managing the militia's
actions. In 1675 some Seneca Nation Indians had killed several English
settlers in the Ann Arundel area. The local army was called out to subdue
the Indians. Flareups continued over the next several years. In 1685
following anther Indian incident, Major Samuel(1) Lane the following letter
to a superior officer:
"The County of Anne Arrundll at this time is in Greate danger. Our men
marched all Monday night, the greatest part of South River had been most
cutt off. Wee want Amunition exceedingly, and have not where-with-all to
furnish half our men. I hope your Ldpp. (lordship) will dispach away Coll.
Burges with what Amunition may be thought convient. I shall give all the
care that lieth in me, but there comes daily and hourely Complaints to me
that I am wholly Imployed in the Country's Service.
Sept. 13 1681 In haste with my humble service
Samuel(1) Lane"
Under considerable hardships, Major Lane along with other similar
military groups were able "to fight,kill,take,vanquish,overcome,follow and
destroy" the Indians and bring safety and peace to the area.

Dutton Lane - Abt. 1665-1726

Son of Samuel (1). Born in 1665. In 1693 married Pretiotia Tydings.
Lived at Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Inherited Browsley Hall and other
properties from his father. On 2 May, 1704, sold his personal estate to
Benjamin Hooker. On 15 January, 1709, Dutton and his wife sold their share
of the New Years Purchase properties. He was considered a wealthy, high
class person. Somewhere about this time period, Dutton Lane purchased or
came into ownership of thousands of acres of Virgin lands in the area of
Bedford County, Pennsylvania. Dutton and Pretiotia's children were
Richard, Samuel (2), Margaret, and Sarah. Dutton died in 1726.

Rev. Dutton Lane Born abt. 1671
SOURCE:.... LARRY & ELAINE BLACKMAN..... BLACKMAN - FARMER ROOTS SOURCE:.. ..CAROLYN WINCH.....WINCH/PROFFIRR GENEALOGY DATABASE. WAS DEPUTY SHERIFF IN 1713 & LAND SURVEYOR IN 1700, LAND OWNER IN BALTIMORE CO. MARYLAND. SOURCE FRED SHULTZ

Samuel (2) Lane - ?? to about 1778

Son of Dutton Lane. Probably moved to Bedford County, Pennsylvania in
early life. Married Jane (possibly Corbin) on 10 January, 1736. During
his life, he sold many large tracts of land. Probably lived on the fruits
of his inheritance. Lived at Baltimore County, Maryland at various times.
Few and sketchy records exist on this person. Samuel (2) died by 1779
in Bedford County, Pennsylvania. Samuel (2) and Jane had issue: Samuel,
1736: Lambert; Richard; Charity; Wilkinson-1743; Sarah-1746; Corbin;
Dutton; Abraham; and John - 1756.

Samuel Lane Born abt 1700

Another Source information found.

Samuel LANE Sex: M Birth: ABT 1700 in Baltimore County, MD Death: 1779 Note: NOTE ON LANE FAMILY: Note: Note: Note: LANES IN SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA AND NORTHEAST TENNESSEE Note: Note:
Our Lane family originated near Baltimore, MD. Several Lanes were early pioneers in southwest Virginia and northeast Tennessee, which was then part of North Carolina. Three brothers, Lambert, Corbin and Dutton Lane came to the area in the 1770's or early 1780's. Two of their first cousins, brothers Tidence and John Fuller Lane brought their families to the area from the Yadkin River area of NC in the 1770's. The exact dates are uncertain, but there is evidence that all were here before 1781. Thomas Lane, son of John Lane and a nephew of Lambert, Corbin and Dutton, came to Greene County about 1805, and it is possible that his brother John and three sisters came with him. A sister of Lambert, Corbin and Dutton, Sarah Lane Hays and her husband Joseph Hays may also have come to Greene Co, TN about 1800.
Note: Note:
Lambert (1737-1804) was the first arrival, getting here before 1776. He and his wife, Nancy Anderson, moved from the Susquehanna River area to some part of Virginia where they reportedly lived for about four years, and then to the Holston River settlement in present day Tennessee where they "lived in the wild woods near the Indians." 1n 1777, he was a soldier in an expedition against the Cherokee Indians from the Holston Settlement. He is listed in the DAR Index as having served in the Virginia militia during the Revolutionary War. He apparently moved his family to Shelby County, Kentucky, after staying in the Tennessee area for only a few years. I have no proof of any of his descendants still in this area. (But I am a bit suspicious that Ann Lane, b. abt 1758, a known Indian ancestor of my Mother's family could have been a daughter of Lambert.)
Note: Note:
Tidence (1724-1805) and John Fuller Lane (1727-1785) were in the area by 1778 when Tidence founded the Buffalo Ridge Meeting House (Baptist Church) near modern day Gray, TN. Tidence is widely recognized as the first pastor of an organized church in Tennessee. They may have been here earlier because the families were close friends of William Bean, who settled in the area in 1769, and is considered the first settler in the state. They were neighbors of William Bean in Pittsylvania County, Va. and were neighbors in 1778 near Boones Creek. Richard Lane, father of Tidence and John Fuller Lane, moved his family from Maryland to Pittsylvania County, VA, in 1746. Tidence and John Fuller Lane were several years older than their cousins Lambert, Corbin, Dutton, John and Sarah.
Note: Note:
Tidence moved to Jefferson County, near modern day Whitesburg, about 1785 where he started another church and became a leader in the organization of the Holston Association. It appears that his family followed him and many continued to move
west with the frontier. It appears that none of his family moved to Scott County, VA, but some stayed in Greene Co. Larry James of Neosho, MO, has written an excellent book on the early Lane family and is a descendant of Tidence.
Note: Note:
John Fuller Lane died intestate in 1785 under mysterious circumstances (said to have been poisoned by a slave woman.) His wife remarried and moved much of the family to Claiborne County. Some of his family also moved to McMinn County and other areas in middle Tennessee. Some of his children may have stayed in the area, and their descendants may still be here, since some of his children's families have not been documented.
Note: Note: Corbin and Dutton Lane probably brought their families to the area about 1780. All Lanes in Scott County that have been connected to the pioneer families are descended from either Corbin or Dutton.
Note: Note:
Corbin Lane (abt 1740-1816) was born in MD and was living in Bedford County, PA, 1773-1779. He was a Revolutionary War Patriot in Sullivan-Washington County, NC (now TN), having provided supplies or services in 1781-83. Other sources have
reported him as a soldier, but the DAR has not found proof of his being a soldier. In Jan 1783, he sold 150 acres of land on a branch of Lick Creek in Greene Co. He had surveyed 250 acres of land on Feb 18, 1782 at modern-day Red Hill in Scott Co where he was living at his death in 1816. He moved to Greene County, NC (now TN), in 1787 and got a land grant. He had several land transactions in Greene County, TN. He left Greene Co about 1795 and he permanently moved back to his home on Red Hill in what is now Scott County. He and his sons Abraham (Lane) and Samuel (Lain) signed the petition to form Scott County in 1814. Corbin is thought to have married twice. Children of his first wife are thought to have been Thomas, Mary Susan (m. Samuel Este!
Note:
p), and maybe Elizabeth (m. Shadrack Estep). He and his second wife, Frances Prock (or Proctor), are thought to have been parents of Rachel (m. Asa Pennington), Samuel, Abraham, Rebecca (m. John Penley), Frances (m. John Williams), Ruth (m. Thomas Spears), and Temperance (m. James Williams). Some think that another daughter was Catherine (m. John Peters.) Thomas may have been the one who died in Greene Co in 1792, or he may be the one who lived in Hawkins Co. No descendants
Note:
of Thomas have been discovered yet. John & Frances Williams did not have any children. Asa & Rachel Pennington moved to TN, KY, Ind and MO. John & Rebecca Penley moved to Ky. Many descendants of Mary Susan, Elizabeth, Abraham, Samuel, and Temperance are known, and active research is underway to identify more descendants of Rachel, Rebecca and Ruth.
Note: Note:
Dutton Lane (1745-after 1828) has often been confused with other Dutton Lanes. Tidence had a son by the same name and about the same age, and Tidence's brother Dutton also had a son by the same name. There is strong evidence that the Dutton
whose family was in Scott and Greene Counties in the early 1800's and whose family stayed in this area was the brother of Corbin. It appears that Corbin and Dutton probably came to the area together from Bedford Co, PA with a possible short stay in North Carolina. Dutton lived mostly in Greene Co, but he was in Scott County in 1815, 1820 and 1828. Some of his family stayed in Scott County, and are among the Scott County Lanes. Dutton was married twice (to Mary and to Kezia who died in Scott Co, VA, at the age of 100 in 1850) and is thought to have had the following children: Joseph, Samuel, William, Susannah, Nancy (m. Stephen Loveall), Dutton Jr, Benjamin, Kezia (m. John Hood), Abraham, John, Catherine (m. Henry Starnes) and Mary (m. Field!
Note:
s Davis). Soloman could be another son, but evidence now points to his being a son of William Lane and grandson of Dutton Lane. Henry & Catherine Starnes left Scott Co in 1830, and their descendants have not been located. I have not been able to find any descendants or a marriage or descendants for Susannah. Children of the others are known. There is no proof and a lot of uncertainty about Dutton's family since very few documents exist and all of the evidence is circumstantial.
Note: Note: Donald W. Lane Note: 10/30/1998 HIST: Birth: Location - Kenyon Stevenson & A. Russle Slagle GENEALOGY & HISTORY, 5/15/1944. Date - HIST: Death: Kenyon Stevenson & A. Russle Slagle GENEALOGY & HISTORY, 5/15/1944. Change Date: 7 MAY 1999

Father: Rev. Dutton LANE b: ABT 1665/1670 in Anne Arundel co. MD
Mother: Pretitia TYDINGS b: ABT 1674

Marriage 1 Jane CORBIN b: ABT 1708

Jane Corbin Born abt. 1708

Source Information

Name: Jane Corbin Sex: F Birth: ABT. 1708 in , Baltimore, Maryland Death: ABT. 1773 in , Baltimore, Maryland HIST: Birth: Janet Kay Barbee - 438 Carousel Court, Gaithersburg, MD 20877. JBARBEE@GAO.GOV HIST: Death: Kenyon Stevenson & A. Russle Slagle GENEALOGY & HISTORY, 5/15/1944. Note:
[lisabackup3C.FTW]

CORBIN - (Eng. Fr. Ireland) -- Dweller at the sign of the raven. The name of Corbin has been associated with the history of Virginia since the earliest Colonial times. The hon. Henry Corbin came to the colony in 1650 and resided in Stratton Major Parrish in King and Queen County, and afterward at Buckingham house where he died in 1676. He was a member of King's Counsil and a burgess from Lancaster..
Samuel Lane and Jane Corbin had a son, Samuel who married a Mary Corbin, daughter of Benjamin and Sarah Lye Corbin.


Father: Edward Corbin b: in , Baltimore, Maryland
Mother: Mary Jane Wilkerson b: 1697 in , Baltimore, Maryland

Marriage 1 Samuel Lane II b: 1700 in , Baltimore, Maryland
* Married: 1738 in , Baltimore, Maryland
Children
1. Corbin Lane b: 1750 in , Baltimore, Maryland

Rev. Tidence Lane Born August 30, 1724
OURCE:... SANDY WARD..... SANDY'S FAMILY TREE.... 1 AND LARRY & ELAINE BLACKMAN N::::SOURCES::::THE LANE FAMILY - THE ANCESTRY AND DESCENDANTS OF REV. TIDENCE L ANE ..BY LARRY A. JAMES (1982)..."REYNOLDS HISTORICAL GENEALOGY COLLECTION"..FORT WAYNE, IN. LIBRARY....2- LANE MAILING LIST BY JOHN T. HARRIS(JHARRIS924@AOL. COM) ON NOV.6, 1996....3- MD. MARRIAGES 1664 - 1777, COMP. BY ROBERT BURNES.ALSO OUR ANCESTORS --DON CHESNUT FAMILY TREE
ID:l1122
Source::Ancestors of Lisa Gibson

Corbin Lane 1750

Corbin Lane Sex: M Birth: 1750 in , Baltimore, Maryland Death: 8 DEC 1816 in , Scott, Virginia Fact 1: Revolutionary War Patriot Note:
[lisabackup3C.FTW]

From Fanny Lane Steel's book (1991)
Corbin went with his family to Pennsylvania (from MD) and was living in Dublin Township of Bedford Couty from 1773-1779. He may have lived in Guilford Co., NC for awhile. He moved to Washington CO. Tenn, the land which was once in NC. He owned 150 acres of land there in 1781, along with his brother, Dutton Lane. Corbin Lane was a Revolutionary War soldier and received land grants from the State of NC for his services in 1782 and 1783. He is listed in "Tennessee Soldiers in the Revolutionary War" by Allen.
Corbin is said to have been married twice, first wife unknown. He married 2nd to Frances Brock or Prock. She is said to have been of German descent. His first children were probably by his first wife. Corbin was in Greene County TN as is seen by the following land records:
Book 1, pg 346 - 20 sept 1787, State of NC to Corbin Lane, 150 acres bording on James McCartney.
Book 4 pg 31 4 Aug 1789, Corbin Lane sold the 150 acres above to Samuel Montgomery
Book 5 pg 11 Jan 1793, Corbin Lane received a grant adjoining the above land
Book 8 pg 352 - 18 Nov 1795 sold 279 acres to Samuel McNease
Book 8 pg 355 - Dec 1795 Corbin Lane again sold land to McNease
Corbin and Dutton Lane were bondsmen for Mary Lane and Samuel Estep to marry, in 1788 in Greene Co. TN
Next we find Corbin Lane in Lee Co., Virginia in 1782 having land surveyed there, 250 acres. He evidently went back and forth for awhile to Greene CO., TN. He had land in Russell Co. VA according to deeds found in Russell Co. Land records of Samuel and Shadrack Estep, having land adjoining "Corbin Lain's Open line" in 1802 on Big Mockeson Creek.
From DONALD LANE: Corbin Lane surveyed 250 acres of land at Red Hill on Feb 18 1782, and it was recorded in Le co VA. He was on the 1781 tax list in Washington Co NC (now TN) and sold 150 acres on a branch of Lick Creek on Jan 14 1783.
Corbin Lane did not appear on any tax lists in Washington co or Green co between 1782 and 1786 so he apparently lived on the farm in Red Hill. He appeared again in Greene co NC (TN) in 1787. Indian raids were a major problem in SW VA at that time, so it is probably that the family left VA because of the threat. The Indian problem was eliminated in 1794, and Corbin Lane returned to the farm at Red Hill in 1795. The farm at Red Hill was in the valley north of the present day Red Hill Church; the church is located at the SE corner of the farm.
Corbin Lane owned land in Lee Co until 1810 or after. Joseph Brock owned 5000 acres of land in Lee County on Wallens Ridge. This Joseph Brock may be the father of Frances Brock Lane, Corbin's wife. Corbin is on the Tax list for Russell county, VA in 1810. He signed a petition in 1814 for a new county to be taken from Washington, Lee and Russell counties, which would be called Scott Co. VA
In Law Order book 5 pg 84, year 1814, the following:
On motion of Corbin Lane it is ordered that he be exempted from the payment of County levies and from rates on account of his age and bodily infirmities, also that he be exempted from paying county poor rates and public tax for an aged infirm slave called _____?"
Corbin Lane left a will in 1816 in Scott Co. VA naming his wife Frances, Sons Samuel and Abraham Lane
Deeded 150 acres in Greene Co. Tenn in 1787 "joining James McCartneys lines". James McCartney is listed as having received 300 acres in Green co. "south of the Holston River (p 91), but this was in 1788. The McCartney name (no first name) is listed in Washington co. 1882-4 on pg 8 (Joseph Buller, 150 acres on north side of McCartney's Mountain); pg 21 (Samuel Moore, 150 acres "near the head of Little Sinking Creek south McCartney's Nobbs", 1883 ); pg 24 (James Stewart, 200 acres "on the south fork of Lick Creek including McCartney's Camp--1824).
CORBIN LANE
Patriot, Pioneer, Patriarch
Corbin Lane was born about 1735-42, probably near Baltimore, MD, and was one of eleven children of Samuel and Jane (Corbin) Lane. His birth date is uncertain, but he was on a tax list near Baltimore in 1763. He was the grandson of Rev. Dutton and Pretitia (Tydings) Lane and Edwin and Mary Jane (Wilkerson) Corbin. His grandfather, Dutton Lane was a Quaker minister who became a Quaker after marrying into the Tydings family. His great-grandfather was Col Samuel Lane, one of the early
leaders of Maryland.
Very little is known about Corbin's life before coming to the Northeast Tennessee (then North Carolina) and southwest Virginia area in 1779-81. His father, Samuel Lane, had numerous land transactions in Maryland and the family was apparently prosperous, but no will or family Bible has been found to prove the family members. Biographies of two of Corbin's brothers, Rev Samuel Lane, Jr, of Pennsylvania, and Lambert Lane, of Kentucky, have provided some clues of the family.
Corbin's parents apparently spent several years in England in the early 1740's because Lambert and Richard were said to have been born there. Lambert was said to have married in 1760 while "living in the wild country among the Indians" on the Susquehanna River, and there is one reference that Samuel Lane bought land there after selling several tracts near Baltimore about 1755. These stories suggest that Corbin may have spent several years of his youth in a wilderness area around the Susquehanna River and may explain the pioneering nature of the family. There are some indications that Corbin was educated because he signed his deeds in Greene Co, NC (now TN) and was involved in activities suggesting at least a moderate education.
Corbin's first known public record was his appearance on a tax list in Baltimore Co, MD in 1763. Also present on the list were Samuel Lane Sr and Samuel Lane Jr. The next listing was in 1773 on a tax list in Bedford Co, PA, with his brothers Dutton and Samuel Jr. They were also at the same location in 1779, but the next appearance of Corbin's name was on a tax list in Washington Co, NC/Tenn in 1781 and when he purchased 250 acres of land in Lee Co, VA (now Scott Co) on Feb 18, 1782.
Corbin Lane served the Revolutionary War in Sullivan Co and Washington Co, North Carolina (now Tennessee) by providing supplies and services in 1782 and 1783 as proven by two pay vouchers, No. 279 dated 6/26/1782 and No. 1391 dated 6/12/1783.
The details of his Revolutionary War services are not known; DAR research has caused them to list him as a Patriot, but not (yet) as a soldier as some other references has indicated. It is probable that he participated in militia campaigns against the Indians that were aiding the British in the war. There is no evidence that Corbin or Dutton Lane participated in the battle of King's Mountain on Oct 7, 1780, so he likely arrived in the northeast Tennessee and southwest Virginia area after that date. Ten Lanes were in the battle.
It is probable that Corbin and his brother Dutton came to Washington Co and/or Greene Co, North Carolina (now Tennessee) together about 1780-81. They likely traveled with other Maryland families that moved about that time (notably, the Esteps and Lovells) and may have spent some time in modern day North Carolina before coming to this area. They followed their brother Lambert Lane who apparently came to the area in the early 1770's and their first cousins Tidence Lane and John Fuller Lane who also came in the early 1770's from the Yadkin River area of North Carolina. Tidence and John Fuller Lane were close friends of William Bean, usually considered to be Tennessee's first permanent settler in 1769. They had been neighbors in Pittsylvania Co, Virginia and were neighbors near present day Gray, Tennessee; there is some suggestion that they were also neighbors in Maryland prior to the move to Pittsylvania Co, VA, in 1746. One researcher has also suggested that William Bean's wife was
a Lane, but no substantial evidence has been found. Tidence Lane was the first preacher of a permanent church in Tennessee, founding the Buffalo Ridge Baptist Church at Gray about 1777. There is no indication that Corbin and Dutton Lane had a close association with Tidence and John Fuller Lane, but they would have obviously had some contact and would have been influenced by them. Tidence was born in Maryland in 1724, and was thus several years older than Corbin and Dutton.
Corbin Lane likely lived on the 250 acres in Red Hill that he bought in 1782 until about 1786 when he got a land grant in Greene Co, NC/TN. Abraham Lane was born January 18, 1783 in Russell Co, VA (now Scott Co) according to his death record in Scott Co, VA. But all censuses report place his birthplace in Tennessee. All evidence points to the death record being correct, but Abraham would have identified to spending his youth in Greene Co where the family lived 1786-1795. It is likely that the family had to leave Virginia in 1786 because of the Indian attacks in southwest Virginia at that time. As soon as it was safe to return to Virginia, the family did so in 1795, and they returned to the same 250 acres at Red Hill that Corbin had purchased in 1782.
Evidence indicates that Corbin Lane and his family lived the rest of his life on the 250 acre farm in the present day Red Hill community north of Gate City, Virginia. The southern border of the farm is about where the present-day road passes the Benton and Vineyard Cemeteries and one corner was near the present day Red Hill Methodist Church. This farm was on one of the better farm sites in Scott Co, and is generally good land. The exact home site on the farm has not been identified, but it probably was at the springs in the valley and the same as where Abraham built a log house in 1820 that was said to be one of the largest log houses in the area; that house burned in 1943.
The exact location of the home in Greene Co has not been determined, but it was probably on Lick Creek between Greeneville and modern-day Baileyton. Corbin probably lived in Greene Co before buying land in Virginia; he sold 150 acres on Lick Creek on January 14, 1783. Corbin bought and sold at least five tracts of land in Greene Co. While in Greene Co, he was named by court records on four occasions as part of groups to build roads; on one occasion, he was named as the overseer of the project.
There are few public records of Corbin Lane between 1795 and his death in 1816. He has been thought to have been a land dealer because of his activity in Greene Co, but few deeds have actually been found in Lee, Russell or Washington Cos. In 1814, he was exempted from paying county taxes on account of his age and bodily infirmities, and he was also exempted from paying county poor rates and public tax for an aged infirmed slave called Cuff. He signed the petition to form Scott Co in 1814. An aged slave woman named Cuff was also named in Corbin's will in 1816, but there is no other information about her.
Corbin's wife was Frances "Fanny" Prock (or Brock, Frock or Proctor). Her last name is from tradition since no public records of their marriage or her parents has been found. We can speculate that she and Corbin married in Pennsylvania or Maryland prior to moving to Tennessee and Virginia; if she was from Pennsylvania or Maryland, her name was likely Proctor since there were several well-known Proctor families in the area. William Proctor was a judge in Bedford Co, PA in the 1770s. Another possibility is that Frances was living in North Carolina and they married after Corbin moved. Her first name appears on the death record of Abraham Lane, and she testified in the Wolfe vs. Wolfe court case in Wytheville, VA. No record of Frances has been found after Corbin's death except for the court testimony. She likely would have lived with one of her children, or she may have died shortly after Corbin. Most people think that Frances was Corbin's second wife because of the gap of several years in the children's birth dates between the early 1770s and 1778. Corbin and Dutton were probably both widowed in Pennsylvania, then remarried in the late 1770s and came to the area together. Dutton's first wife was named Mary, and his second was Kezia. Kezia died at the age of 100 in Scott Co in 1850, and her birthplace was given as Pennsylvania.
Corbin named only two sons, Abraham and Samuel, in his will and that has been frustrating to researchers for many years, since he was thought to have had at least ten children. They were as follows:
1. Elizabeth Lane, (b. abt 1765/70 - d. bef 1820), married Shadrach Estep. She is a possible daughter. She had 9 children, including a son Corbin Estep.
2. Thomas Lane, (b. abt 1770 - d. 1792?), no information.
3. Mary Susan Lane, (b. 1771 - d. 1820/29), married Samuel Estep in Greene Co. They had 9 children.
4. Rachel Lane, (b. 1778/80), married Asa Pennington in Lee Co, VA, and lived in TN, KY and IND. They had 7 children.
5. Abraham Lane, (b. 1/18/1783 - d. 2/28/1869), married Catherine Wolfe, lived in Scott Co, VA. They had 14 children.
6. Samuel Lane, (b. 1784 - d. 1818/20), married Mary Speer, lived in Scott Co, VA. They had 4 children.
7. Frances Lane, (b. 1780/90 - d. aft 1830), married John Williams, lived in Scott Co, VA. She had no children.
8. Rebecca Lane, (b. 1788 - d. 1850/53), married John Penley, lived in Wayne Co, KY. They had 10 children.
9. Ruth Lane, (b. 1790 - d. aft 1850), married Thomas Spears, lived in Floyd Co, KY. They had 10 children.
10. Temperance Lane, (b. 1793/95 - d. aft 1860), married James Williams, lived in Scott Co, VA. They had 10 children.
Research is presently underway to determine the possibility that Catherine (b. 1778 - d. 1855) who married John Peters was a Lane and another daughter of Corbin Lane. Tradition in some branches of the family is that she was a Lane and John's second wife.
The first three of Corbin's children were probably born of his first wife. Only Abraham, Samuel and Mary are proven children, but there are very strong evidences that the others were his children. There are legends that also suggest that William Lane and Benjamin Lane were Corbin's sons, but circumstantial evidence indicates that they were Dutton's sons. Records on the frontier during the late 1700's and early 1800's are very limited, but we keep hoping that a conclusive document will be discovered soon to prove all of his children. The search is also made difficult by the large number of Lanes in this area in the early years.
We of Abraham Lane's family are very fortunate that our lineage to Corbin Lane is solidly proven, and anyone who has an interest in joining the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) or the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) can do so.
So far, I have identified about 30,000 descendants of Corbin Lane. But there probably are more than 50,000 descendants and maybe as many as 100,000.
Donald W. Lane
10/30/1998

1773-9 TAX LISTS OF BEDFORD CO PA 1781-3 SOLDIER WASHINGTON CO
VOL 1 PAGE 17 FOLIO 2 TWO PAY VOUCHERS DATED JUNE 26 1782 NUMBER 279 AND JUNE 12 1783 NUMBER 1391. GOOD FOR GOODS AND SERVICE PATRIOT

MOVED TO PA. 1773-1779

Recorded in a manuscript volume in the coustody of the state archives of North Carolina, titled" REVOLUTIONARY ARMY ACCOUNTS" ( Volume 1 , page 17, folio 2)
Heading: An [acc] count of specie Certificates paid into the Comptrollers Office by John Armstrong Entry taker for land in Nor[th] Carolina---vizt---

Number: 1391
By Whom Granted: Carter & Williams
To whom Granted: Corbin Lane
Date: 12 June 1783
Sum: 34 pounds, 8 shillings, 6 pence
Interest: 14 shillings, 6 pence
To what time: 23rd oct 1783
Total amount Principal and Intrest: 35 pounds, 3 shillings


WILL OF CORBIN LANE

WILL BOOK 1 PAGE 88 SCOTT CO., VIRGINIA


I Corbin Lane of SCOTT CO., the sate ofVirginia, do hereby make my last written testement, in manner of form following, that is to say, first I desire that all my debpts and funeral expences to be paid after my decease. Should the principle part of my property prove sufficint for the above proposal to settle payment of my debpts and the funneral expences, I give to my lovely wife Frances Lane, one mare called Clase, one cow and calf, also ten dollars in cash and all my household furniture, and i also give to my son Abraham lane, my tract of land which i now live on, which contains fifty acres, and i also give to my son Samuel Lane all the ballance of my prpperty, at my decease. I constitute and make this sole execution of this my last will and testement, and this to be my last will and testement given under my seal this 8th day of Dec 1816.
Corbin Lane

Witnesses, James Davidson, Micheal Ellis, and Catherine Williams

(among the list of his personal estate was - 1 Negro woman named Cuff - val. $20.00

compiled by J.N. adams 116 Regent Circle Oak Ridge, Tn, 1984







Father: Samuel Lane II b: 1700 in , Baltimore, Maryland
Mother: Jane Corbin b: ABT. 1708 in , Baltimore, Maryland

Marriage 1 Frances Proctor b: 1762
Children
1. Temperance Lane b: 1793 in , Russell, Virginia

Aquilla Lane Born May 18, 1753
SOURCE::: COMPILED BY LARRY A. JAMES PRINTED AND IN POSSESSION OF BILLIE JO GOO DEN, SEE HIS WILL DATE APRIL 26, 1816 AND PROBATED ON MAY 13, 1820 IN JEFFERSON CO, TN. SONS: THOMAS JEFFERSON, GARRET, HARISON, TIDENCE JOHN, PLEASANT:: DAUGHTERS... ESTER, JANE, THEANY, CLEAR, ANN, ADELINA.. WIT. SAMUEL LANE, THOMAS HA LE, TIDENCE LANE, GEORGE IRVIN...EXEC. PLEASANT LANE...RON GOODEN AND BILLIE MAXWELL FAMILY HISTORY.

John Lane - 1756 to about 1843

Son of Samuel (2) Lane. Born 22 February, 1756 in Baltimore County,
Maryland. Much of his early life he lived at Bedford County, Pennsylvania.
Sometime in early maturity, he married Mary Low of Bedford County. No
children of record from this marriage. No record of its culmination
sometime around 1800. Records indicate John sold and warranted Title to
some 700 acres of Bedford County lands between 1794 and 1806. His wife,
Mary Low, also sold another 400 acres of Bedford County lands in 1794.
In early 1776, John Lane enlisted in the Pennsylvania Rifle Regiment. This
was a crack-unit that fought in most of the major battles of the Revolution
from Bunker Hill to the British Surrender at Yorktown, New Jersey.
Discharged in 1778. Pension application made and approved in 1832.
John came to Ohio from Pennsylvania in 1805. He was one of the
earliest settlers to these western wilderness lands. He settled on and
later purchased land on the Connecticut Western Reserve at Austintown,
Trumbull County, (after 1843, Mahoning Co.) Ohio.
About 1805/06 John remarried to Mary Woodrow. She was 10 or more
years younger than John. They had nine children. Their oldest son, Henry,
born 29 July 1807, lived at the John Lane homestead with his wife, Jane
Daniels, until 1857. John Lane died at Austintown, Mahoning County, Ohio
in 1843. His wife, Mary, died about 1868 in Mahoning County.

John Lane - Tidbits

John Lane purchased his farm in Austintown in 1814. At the time, it
was within the Connecticut Western Reserve. By Charter in 1662, King
Charles II of England granted the Colony of Connecticut all lands contained
between the forty-first and forty-second parallels of north latitude from
Providence Plantations to the Pacific Ocean on the West. After years of
controversy, about 1797, Connecticut's claim to those lands, lying within
what is now the State of Ohio, was resolved after a fashion. The
Connecticut Western Reserve was created. Some appropriations to residents
of New London, Connecticut for fire losses suffered during the
Revolutionary War were made. The balance of this huge territory was sold
to a private organization known as the Connecticut Land Company. The land
was surveyed and resold to individuals. One of the original investors in
the Land Company was Gideon Granger. John Lane's purchase of his land at
Austintown was made in 1814 with the seller being Gideon Granger.

At the time John Lane arrived in Ohio, about 1805, Indian problems were
commonplace and a constant danger. At the time no land agreements had been
reached with the Indians and the Army was of little use in providing
protection to settlers. A white settler named McMahon shot an Indian
called Captain George. This killing stirred up Indian animosity and they
threatened to retaliate against the white settlers.
In expectation of an Indian attack, John Lane along with several other
men and their families gathered at Quimby's, a fortified house at Warren in
preparation for defending against the expected attack. After some time,
John Lane, in the late afternoon, went into the woods to scout about.
While walking, beyond sight of the house, John's foot slipped on a log,
badly dislocating an ankle. He was unable to walk and it was getting dark.
He shot his gun several times to let his friends know he was in trouble.
He called, whistled and yelled for help to no avail. His friends hearing
the shots and hearing his yelling, assumed he had been captured by Indians.
They believed his cries were from torture and attempts by the Indians to
entice other whites to come to his assistance. His cries continued
throughout the night. No one went to check or help John. The following
morning as the cries and noise continued from the woods, one brave man,
William Crooks, went to check on it. He found an irate and bedraggled John
Lane. He assisted Lane back to safety. The group continued on guard for
fourteen days against an attack that never materialized. By that time, the
crisis had passed and no further trouble was foreseen. There is no record
of how the men made peace with John. John apparently recovered to live a
long life.

The 1820 Census indicates John Lane had 8 slaves and 3 (indentured)
persons.


The Disciples or Christian Church, Trumbull County, Ohio, had
originated as a Baptist Congregation. At Austintown, a Church was
organized in 1813. John Lane was a Charter Member of this church. He
attended and supported it faithfully during his lifetime. An early
minister to the Church was a Preacher named Alexander Campbell. His
teachings were closely related to the teachings of the Mormons. Mr.
Campbell later joined the Mormons at Kirkland. He aspired to become the
Mormons leader upon the death of Joseph Smith but was defeated by Brigham
Young. During the fray, Campbell organized a following of supporters known
to the Mormons as the 'Campbell Movement'. This was an early schism in the
Mormon religious history and is treated as contemptible by orthodox
Mormons, even in 1993.
While there is no evidence that John Lane or any other members of the
Disciples Congregation followed Campbell's teachings, they were certainly
exposed to them during his stay in Trumbull County.
John Lane enlisted in the Continental Army in 1776. He joined the
Pennsylvania Rifle Company. His service number was S2042. He remained in
the Army until the end of the Revolutionary War in 1778.
The Pennsylvania Rifle Regiment is of interest. Shortly prior to the
outbreak of the 1776 War, the rifled gun-barrel had been invented and
developed in Pennsylvania. This rifle was a great improvement over the old
smooth bore muskets and their ball type bullets. The British Army of the
time was equipped with the smooth bore rifles. These new type rifles were
effective at considerably longer distances and greatly improved accuracy
over the old type guns. The new type rifle, while superior, was in limited
supply and its manufacture was slow. Initially, there were enough of the
new rifles available to equip the Pennsylvania Rifle Regiment. Its members
were greatly admired and were considered one of the crack outfits of the
Army at this time.
The use of the Regiment was in demand by the Continental Army for
nearly every battle of the Revolution. With its sharpshooters, its longer
gun range and with the Unit strategically placed for battle, the Regiment
was very effective at decimating the Officer Ranks of the opposing Army.
The Unit created a great deal of consternation and depressed morale in the
British Army ranks. With time, other Continental Regiments were
supplied with the new rifles. However, the prestige and glamor of being
the first and best remained with the Pennsylvania Rifle Regiment. The
Regiment of John Lane arrived in Boston some ten days after the Battle of
Bunker Hill at Boston. It skirmished throughout the thirteen colonies and
nearly all the major battles during the next 2.5 years. They moved on
their feet as they had no other transport. The Unit had quite heavy
casualties due to hardships and long exposure to battles. John Lane was
not wounded during the War but his records indicate he suffered 'a great
hurt (rupture) by lifting a large stone while building Fort Putnam'.
That John Lane was a Revolutionary War Veteran is well documented in
the Pennsylvania Archives. However, the War pension files, while sketchy,
raise some questions. The records indicate he moved to Baltimore County,
Maryland for 8 or 9 years and then returned to Bedford County,
Pennsylvania. Tax lists for Baltimore County, Maryland between 1776 and
1790 show several relatives of John but no John Lane. Tax lists of Bedford
County, Pennsylvania also fail to show John Lane as a resident. The
Bedford County tax lists do include several of John's brothers and also a
Richard Low, who is believed to be the father of Mary Low, John's first
wife. We assume he probably lived in Bedford County. He and his wife sold
several tracts of land in Bedford County during the 1776-1800 period, which
further supports this belief.
The Pension Files also indicate John Lane made his application for a
pension in 1832 from Bedford County, Pennsylvania. From early Ohio
records, we know John Lane lived at Austintown, Trumbull County, Ohio with
his second wife and family and had been at this location since about 1805.
It is possible that John submitted his pension Application using the
Bedford County address of brothers or sisters to show a Pennsylvania
residence. Whether a bit of chicanery was involved or a mistake in the
records is left unsettled.

Samuel Lane Born Between 1770-1771
SOURCE: "THE LANE FAMILY - THE ANCESTRY AND DESCENDANTS OF REV. TIDENCE LANE" Compiled by Larry A. James 1982. LDS Library Project and Fiche #ZLIB 7-10S 3273 . CALL #60197 73 - Printed and in possession of Billie Jo Gorden. Samuel LANE< youngest son of Rev. Tidence and Hester Bibber LANE, was born 1770-1771....Must see last will and Testament of Samuel Lane.. There are Four sons...SAMUEL, JOHN, TARLTON, AND LEWIS R...DAUGHTERS: NAMED LEAH HALL, PIRMINAH HALE, EDREN PANGLE, MARY B. HALDON, ELIZABETH FRIZZELL AND NANCY LANE:AND MY STEP-DAUGHTERS FRANCIS AND VESTA::: WILL dated MAY 10, 1847 IN PRESENCE OF ATTEST. L.F.WELLS HIS NOAH WHITE SAMUEL X LANE,MARK.

Samuel Lane Born 1770-1771

Another Source information:

Name: Samuel LANE Given Name: Samuel Surname: Lane Sex: M Birth: 1770-1771 in , , Tennessee Death: Y Change Date: 23 Oct 1999 at 19:39 Note:
SOURCE: "THE LANE FAMILY - THE ANCESTRY AND DESCENDANTS O F REV. TIDENCE LANE" Compiled by Larry A. James 1982. LD S Library Project and Fiche # ZLIB 7-10S 3273. CALL #60197 73 - Printed and in possession of Billie Jo Gooden.
Samuel LANE, youngest son of Rev. Tidence and Hester Bibbe r LANE, was born 1770-1771.

1822 Tax List of Jefferson County, Tennessee

Samuel Lane 220 Acres

1830 census of Jefferson County, Tennessee

1 male 15-20 1 female 5-10

2 male 20-25 1 female 10-15

1 male 50-60 1 female 30-40

1 female 60-70

1840 census of Jefferson County, Tennessee

1 male 60-70
Little is known about Samuel Lane outside of the fact that he did inherit most of his father's estate.

Last Will and Testament of Samuel Lane
In the name of God Amen. I Samuel Lane, Sen. of the County of Jefferson and State of Tennessee being of Sound and disposing mind and memory, bringing to mind the mortality of life and knowing that it is appointed unto all men once to die and wishing to dispose of such worldly properties as it hath pleased God to bless me with, do make and ordain and publish this my last will and testament in the manner following to wit.
Item First: It is my will that all my just debts dues an d demands shall be paid out of money arising from the sale of such of my property as does shall or may belong to m y estate and shall not be hereinafter disposed of.
Item Second: To my loving wife, Linda M. Lane I give and bequesth all the property that she brought to me by marriage to her and her heirs to have and to hold forever.
Item Third: To my said wife, Linda I give and bequeath a certain tract or parcel of land lying and being in the count y of Jefferson and Hawkins waters of bent creek bounded a s follows viz.
Beginning on a black Cherry tree near Thomas Jones line running thence westwardly parrallel with my meadow fence t o a stake on the top of the hill. Thence a direct course s o as to include my spring and spring house thence to the lane, thence with the lane.
Samuel Jones house and garden lot., thence with said lot round to the thruing roe, thence to a cherry tree on a bank in said turning roe, thence with said roe to the back fence to the mouth of the lane, thence with the lane to the road, thence a direct course to the Mitchell line, thence northward to the extremity of my land, thence round with the extremity of my land to the beginning.
Which tract or parcel of land all in the henditaments and a purtenances or thereto belonging. I give to my Sd wife Linda and her heirs to have and to hold forever against the lawful claims of all persons whosoever.
Item Fourth: The balance of my land which I suppose is about two hundred acres, I wish to dispose of in this way viz, that my sons, Samuel, John, Tarlton and Lewis have it equally between them so that each shall have an equal share of timber and privilege of water provided that my wife Linda have privilege of firewood rail timber and all othr timbers She or her heirs may need so as not to waist or destroy for which my four sons viz.
Samuel, John, Tarlton and Lewis R. shall pay the sum of twenty five dollars each viz. fifty dollars to my son Garret J. Lane and fifty dollars to my daughter Nancy Lane, further it is my will that my sons Samuel, John and Tarlton hold possession and have the profits of Lewis part of the land until he settles with them for a note of hand they hold against him.
Item Fifth: To my wife Linda I give my personal property the following articles viz, one bed and bed stead and furniture, one black walnut cupboard, one half doz. plates and one dish, one turene, one china cup, one set of knives and forks, one half doz. spoons, one falling leaf table, one small trunk, one clock, one demijohn bottle, one iron wedge, one good ten gallon pot, one small dutch oven and lid, one small skillet.
One half doz. shares, all my water vessels, one iron fist tramel, two pairs of pot hook, two smoothing irons, one boom gears, slup and shuttles, one flour board, one cotton and flax wheel, one pair of cotton and wool cards, one calico bed spread, one new countespar wove by Desto, one five quart pewter basin all my common crockwares, one bread tray , sifter and churn.
One check reel, one small water table, the life of Dr. Franklin, two umbrellas, one mare fret colt named Steamboat together with the possessions and use of one using nag till Said colt is old enough to use, one cow named Star, one newly year old heifer. To my stepdaughter Francis I give one red newly heifer, also to my stepdaughter Vesta, I give my Spring calf.
Item Six: To my Sd wife I give one pair of plow gears, one patent plow, one clevis and singletree, one steele hoe , one small sprouting hoe, drawing knife, one paten right a xe, one large claw hammer, one candlestick, one coffee pot.
Item Seven: I give and bequeath to my loving wife Linda on e sow and five pigs also two shoat pigs also choice of five more of my best hogs, also my stock of sheep, also my stock of geese, ducks and poultry further it is my desire tha t she give Lewis Lane, Jr. 20 weight of feathers if when she can make it convenient.
Item Eight: I give and bequeath to my wife Linda all my gr ain of what is kind, also all my roughness, also all my spinning stuff, wook, cotton, and flax, also all my spun stuff.
Item Nine: To the heirs of Tidence my son, I give and bequeath one forth five acre tract of land, for which I have ma de him a deed and do hereby confirm said deed.
Item Ten: It is further my will that all my personal property not otherwise disposed of viz. house and kitchen furniture, farming utensils all my iron tools, and all singulan o f any property of whatsoever kind, shall be sold on a twelve months credit and the money arising their from be equally divided between my daughters herein after named viz. Lea h Hall, Pirminah Hale, Edren Pangle, Mary B. Haldon, Elizabeth Frizzell and their heirs.
Item Eleven: To my wife Linda I give and bequeath one pair of fine dogs.
Item Twelve: It is my will and I do hereby appoint my beloved and lawful wife and my loving son Samuel Lane to be the exetrix and executor of this my last will and testament I n witness where of I have here unto set my hand and sealth is 10 day of May 1847 in presence of
Attest. L. F. Wells his Noah White Samuel X Lane Mark
Having forgotton some few articles in the body of my will l I do make and ordain this codicil to the Same viz. I give one Side Saddle also that she have the use of all the Sugar trees on the cabin branch also one flax hackle and Set . witness my hand and seal the day and date within written.
Attest: Luther F. Wells his Noah White Samuel X Lane Mark


Father: Tidence LANE b: 31 Aug 1724 in Near Baltimore, Maryland
Mother: Hester BIBBIN OR BIBBER

Marriage 1 Linda M.
* Change Date: 23 Oct 1999
Children
1. Nancy LANE
2. Liah LANE
3. Pirminah LANE
4. Mary LANE
5. Elizabeth LANE
6. Lewis LANE
7. Garrett Jackson LANE b: 16 May 1800 in , Jefferson, Tennessee
8. Samuel LANE b: Abt 1803 in , Jefferson, Tennessee
9. John LANE b: Abt 1804 in , Jefferson, Tennessee
10. Thomas LANE
11. Tarlton LANE b: Abt 1807 in , Jefferson, Tennessee